Bangkok – Wat Pho

Wat Pho is a Buddhist temple located next to the Grand Palace in the Phra Nakhon district.  It is one of the largest (80,000 square metres) and oldest of monasteries in Bangkok and is home to more than 1,000 Buddha images.

The temple is also known as the birthplace of traditional Thai massage.

Just inside the main gate. Chedi beside the Phra Rabieng (Gallery)

Just inside the main gate. Chedi beside the Phra Rabieng (Gallery)

 

 

A Chedi beside the Phra Rabieng (Gallery)

A Chedi beside the Phra Rabieng (Gallery)

 

 

Burning incense is reputed to be a method of purifying the surroundings.

Burning incense is reputed to be a method of purifying the surroundings.

 

 

Candle flame represents the light of the Buddha’s teachings.

Candle flame represents the light of the Buddha’s teachings.

 

 

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A nicely trimmed tree

 

 

Chedis contains the ashes of the royal family

Chedis contains the ashes of the royal family

 

 

Three of the four largest chedis dedicated to the the four Chakri kings

Three of the four largest chedis dedicated to the the four Chakri kings

 

 

Inside a viharn (hall)

Inside a viharn (hall)

 

 

A closer look at the detailed flower motifs

A closer look at the detailed flower motifs

 

 

One of the stone giants at the entrance gates

One of the stone giants at the entrance gates

 

 

Outside the Viharn of the Reclining Buddha

Outside the Viharn of the Reclining Buddha

 

 

The Reclining Buddha is a 15m high and 43m long that is made of plaster bricks and gilded gold.

The Reclining Buddha (15m high x 43m long) is made of plaster bricks and gilded gold.

 

 

108 bronze bowls in the corridor indicate 108 auspicious characters of Buddha. People drop coins in the bowl as it is believed to bring good fortune.

108 bronze bowls indicate 108 auspicious characters of Buddha. People drop coins in the bowl as it is believed to bring good fortune.

 

 

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A single flower in the courtyard

A single flower in the courtyard

 

 

Prang ( shrine element of Buddihist architecture) in the inner courtyard

Prang ( shrine element of Buddihist architecture) in the inner courtyard

 

 

A monk concentrates on his studies

A monk concentrates on his studies

 

 

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