Divaca, Slovenia (1) – Skocjan Caves (Day 9)

Created by the Reka River, the Skocjan Caves are located approximately 3kms outside the town of Divaca, Slovenia.  Listed in the UNESCO’s natural world heritage site, this is one of the largest in the world.

Unfortunately, no photographing is allowed inside the cave so I can only take shots of the exterior area.

The day we visited the Skocjan Caves, it had started and ended with a bit of a panic and confusion.

We initially started the day by going to Lake Bled which is about 50 kms northwest of Ljubljana.  Only a couple of kilometers distance between the station in Lesce and the lake, it was a no-brainer to visit this resort town.  The weather for most of Slovenia called for scattered showers.  However upon our arrival, we were greeted with a downpour of rain.  After some thought, over a cup of coffee, we concluded that this rain was not going to let up.  The idea of returning to Ljubljana and hiding out in our hotel room for the day was definitely not on our agenda.  We decided to go and see the Skocjan Caves which is about 70 kms southwest of Ljubljana.   We figured that if it’s raining there, we will be kept dry in the caves.   Two train changes and two hours later we arrived in Divaca and caught the shuttle bus to our destination.

After our tour, we went to the bus stop to wait for the shuttle bus to Divaca.   However, we discovered that the last ride of the day had already left.  Given an hour to catch the train, we knew our time was limited.  Due to the language barrier, it was difficult communicating with an employee on how to call a taxi.  However, since Divaca was only 3 kilometers away, we knew we can walk (at high speed) to the station.  The only hindering factor was that we didn’t know where we were going.  We only had the memory of an earlier shuttle bus ride and reliant on a GPS system on the iPhone.  Within five minutes of our walk, an individual drove up beside us and asked if we needed a lift into town.  I had seen him earlier at the caves and he appeared to be one of the english speaking tour guides so I trusted him.

Dropping us off at the station, we were able to catch the train with plenty of time to spare  We will be forever grateful…and yes, it had stopped raining by the time we emerged from the caves.

Schmidt Hall, the final section as we exit

 

 

At this point, you can go to the right where you can catch a cable car up to the main area or go to the left and walk up.  We chose the second option.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The rushing Reka River

It was such a gentle walk incline into the caves, that you don’t realize how deep down we were until you see how far up we have to climb.

 

 

 

 

 

The Tominc Cave with a well dedicated to the Viennese Karstologist Franz Kraus

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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